Aztec Codices

2 Comments

The Aztec sun calender is a circular stone wit...

Image via Wikipedia

These are books written by pre-Columbian and colonial-era Aztecs. These codices provide some of the best primary sources for Aztec culture.

Best known are:

1. Madrid Codex: It tackles about the fourth Tlatoani Itzcoatl (ruling from 1427 to 1440) ordered the burning of all historical codices because they believed that it was “not wise that all the people should know the paintings”. Among other purposes, this allowed the Aztec state to develop a state-sanctioned history and myths that tells about Huitzilopochtli.
2. Codex Borbonicus: It is a codex written by Aztec priests shortly before or after the Spanish conquest of Mexico. Like all pre-Columbian codices, it was originally entirely pictorial in nature. It was divided into three sections:
a. Tonalamatl or divinatory calendar.
b. Documentation of the Mesoamerican 52 year cycle, showing in order the dates of the first days of each of these 52 solar years
c. Section of rituals and ceremonies, particularly those that end the 52 year cycle, when the “new fire” must be lit.
3. Boturini Codex: Was a compilation of paintings painted by an unknown Aztec author some time between 1530 and 1541, roughly a decade after the Spanish conquest of Mexico. It tells the story of the legendary Aztec journey from Aztlán to the Valley of Mexico.
4. Codex Mendoza: Is a pictorial document, with Spanish annotations and commentary, composed circa 1541. It is divided into three sections:
a. A history of each Aztec ruler and their conquests
b. A list of the tribute paid by each tributary province
c. A general description of daily Aztec life.
5. Florentine Codex: It is a copy of original source materials which are now lost, perhaps destroyed by the Spanish authorities who confiscated Sahagún’s manuscripts.
Advertisements

DIOSES chapter 1.1 “Olympus”

Leave a comment

DIOSES chapter 1.1 "Olympus"

DIOSES chapter 1.1 "Olympus"

Here is the cover page of Chapter 1.1: “Olympus” , hope you enjoy.

Click on the image to enlarge and read. ^_^

Chapter 1     >>>Title Page<<<     PAGE 1

DIOSES chapter 1 page

1 Comment

ch 1.1 QUADRANTS

ch 1.1 QUADRANTS

Here is DIOSES chapter 1: Quadrants, hope you enjoy.

Click on the image to enlarge and read. ^_^

Cover Page   >>>Chapter 1<<<   Title Page

DIOSES cover page

Leave a comment

here is the cover page, enjoy! ^_^

DIOSES cover page

DIOSES cover page

 

>>>COVER PAGE<<<   Chapter 1   Title Page

click on the image to enlarge and read

enjoy 🙂

Odin and Frigg

Leave a comment

Odin and Frigg

younger versions of Odin and Frigg

Odin, the Norse god of wisdom, is known for being a one-eyed god. One-eyed? It is so because he sacrificed his eye to take a drink in Mimir’s well to gain wisdom and see what the future holds for them. He also has Munnin and Huggin, two ravens that fly across the world (Midgard) and then rest at his shoulders, telling him what the mortals did and some knowledge from the world, too.

Frigg (sometimes Frigga) is his queen-wife. Odin, like Zeus, indulged in several affairs. However, Frigg, unlike Hera, feels no hate and jealousy on her husband’s whereabouts. It is she who encouraged Odin to do so, for the sake of wisdom and knowledge. Frigg is the goddess of the sky, in which she spent her time weaving clouds. She is also a seer, with the ability to see the future, but never dare to tell it to anyone.

Hathor and Ra

3 Comments

Hathor and Ra

Hathor and Ra

Shown here is the younger version of Hathor and Ra.

We all know who Ra is, the great Egyptian Sun-god and the highest of all the Egyptian pantheon. The gods and goddesses, as well as the mortals, regarded him as their greatest god.

A story goes like this:

Ra, the great Sun god, grew old ruling his people. Because of him getting old, his people started doing evil and even taking him for granted, ignoring and breaking his rules and laws.

Being a kind and loving god, he went to see his fellow gods and goddesses to seek advice on what to do. They concluded and told him to send down his eye to destroy these evil men. Ra conceded and send Hathor, also known as the Eye of Ra, to punish the evil and wrongdoers. Hathor happily followed what Ra said, and she slaughter everyone until the Nile river‘s water had the color of the blood: red.

 

Ra, the compassionate god, became bothered by this. It is true that the humans became evil, but still, they were his creations. He decided to stop Hathor before the last man vanished. It is impossible to stop the goddess Hathor, since the sight and smell of blood makes her wild, and it’s apparently obvious that she enjoyed slaughtering these men.

So, what Ra did was to trick Hathor by making a drink that would resemble the color of blood. Ra bade his fastest messengers to have barrels of this drink scattered and spilled across the area, so that Hathor would think that this was the blood of the men she slaughter.

Ra’s idea succeeded, because Hathor, at the sight of this “blood” drank it, and fell asleep (or somewhat, drunk). Upon waking up, Hathor is no longer the dangerous goddess who slaughter the mankind. Ra blessed her and later on, she became the goddess of love, equivalent of the Greek goddess of love Aphrodite.

%d bloggers like this: